There is hope…

Inari Okami is associated both with nature and with prosperity. By Jakub Hałun (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Inari Okami is associated both with nature and with prosperity. By Jakub Hałun (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Because Paganism holds that nature is sacred, the majority of Pagans are also environmentalists. Unfortunately, environmentalism can be frustrating and depressing a lot of the time – it can feel like no matter how much you’re trying to do your bit, it’ll never help because corporations and governments are doing the majority of the damage, and you can feel powerless to do anything about this.

But there are occasionally stories that show us that, despite living in an increasingly industrialised world, there may be some hope on the horizon. IFL Science has reported that last year the global economy grew but carbon dioxide emissions did not – the first time this has ever happened. This has been attributed to countries such as China switching to alternative energy sources.

Reports such as these are a huge encouragement. They demonstrate that yes, it is worth striving for a cleaner, greener world, and it is even possible to do this and still prosper. Rather than letting this news make us complacent, I hope this news helps to spur on people to continue making changes to their lives in order to play there part in the efforts to clean up our planet.

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1 Comment

Filed under Nature & Environment

One response to “There is hope…

  1. EmilyAnn Frances

    No one should ever lose heart! Even our smallest efforts do make a difference. In my locale area a compost program has begun. Right now some blocks are starting to recycle all food leftovers. The program can also recycle paper products like napkins and paper plates that have had food on them. This is wonderful when we consider how all this can eventually be turned into mulch or organic fertilizer to use for our trees in the city parks.

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